Discuss Detroit DISCUSS DETROIT! A WHAT IF about the Downtown Hudson's Store Previous Next
Top of pageBottom of page

Royce
Member
Username: Royce

Post Number: 1672
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Monday, March 16, 2009 - 1:03 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've often wondered, what if Downtown Hudson's had built a large parking deck next to it on the Kern Block and offered validated-free parking, would that have slowed the closure of the store?
Top of pageBottom of page

Crawford
Member
Username: Crawford

Post Number: 517
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, March 16, 2009 - 1:18 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hudson's already had a parking deck next to the library, though I have no idea if it was free with validated purchase.
Top of pageBottom of page

Detourdetroit
Member
Username: Detourdetroit

Post Number: 371
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, March 16, 2009 - 2:15 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have often wondered what if a range of mountains ringed the city of Detroit...
Top of pageBottom of page

East_detroit
Member
Username: East_detroit

Post Number: 2044
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Monday, March 16, 2009 - 3:32 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What if Victor Gruen's parents had never met?
Top of pageBottom of page

Detroitplanner
Member
Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 2267
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, March 16, 2009 - 8:51 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Gruen is hardly a villan. If you read his book 90 percent of his work was done to improve walkability and connectedness of cities. The real villan is the general sloth of the common american. This sloth was capitalized by other architects working for other developers in competing malls, often sucking the life out of the Gruen inspired designs. Most folks going to Northland were supposed to arrive by bus, but buslines were never extended out to maximize usage for both City and suburban residents. Kalamazoo Mall was a failure, not because Gruen was involved, but rather developers built malls that the public could drive to. Mid-town in Rochester NY was arguably his most successful work and stayed around longer than most malls bucking the trend.
Top of pageBottom of page

Royce
Member
Username: Royce

Post Number: 1673
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 12:59 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I see that I'll have to go elsewhere to get some serious responses to my question. However, just in case you don't understand the question, I'll attempt to clarify.

Downtown Hudson's was competing with the suburban malls and one of the things that shoppers to those malls were extolling was the fact that they could get free parking at the malls but not if they came downtown.

The Kern Block had been demolished, leaving a huge piece of land right next to Hudson's. Given the possible loss of shoppers to the downtown Hudson's due to free parking at the suburban malls, I wonder if anyone at Hudson's considered building a large parking structure on the Kern Block and connecting the structure to the store, either by elevated walkways or by placing the structure directly next to store and opening the walls so that people could come directly from the parking structure floors to the floors of the store. (I remember wide hallways near the back of the store that led to the elevators and escalators. These hallways could have led to the parking structure).

Given the size of the casino parking structures, it seems feasible that one could have been built for the downtown Hudson's store. I simply have been wondering all these years if anybody here knows if anyone at Hudson's had considered this or if anything was ever mentioned about doing something like this.

BTW, I know about the talk back in the 70s about cutting off Woodward to car and bus traffic and building a roof over Woodward and enclosing the area to make a "Downtown Mall."
Top of pageBottom of page

Mauser765
Member
Username: Mauser765

Post Number: 3057
Registered: 01-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 7:15 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"Downtown Hudson's was competing with the suburban malls"

You need to read the history of how that actually happened. Look at what company spearheaded the suburban Northland and Eastland malls and anchored them both for two generations.
Top of pageBottom of page

Detroitplanner
Member
Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 2268
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 10:21 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Parking is not a magic bullet that will make or break retail in urban areas. It can help, but it is more important that a market exsists. If you go back to the early 1960's, you will see that (as Mauser pointed out) that Hudson's carved out its market share for its own store by developing Northland and Eastland. These were soon followed by Westland and Southland. Soon other malls popped up to compete with those malls (Universal, Tel-Twelve, Livonia Mall). The deathnail for Downtown Shopping However was Fairlane which pretty much killed 3 downtowns when it was constructed. It was the closest regional mall to the west of Downtown, and many stores moved out of East and West Dearborn to never return. (Even though park was never a problem in Dearborn's Downtowns until relatively recently when it has become like a mini-drunken-food-court-for-yu ppies). Fairlane put more square footage on the market than there was in even the giant Hudson's store.

What is needed is appropriate market-share. If you notice, not even the venerable Marshall Field's store in Chicago uses the amount of Square feet it used to when it was operating full guns (closed floors, holes cut in the center to create open-spaces). My trip to Philly provided me an experience at the Wannamaker's store that was very disapponting. It was being operated as a Lord and Taylor at the Time and down to one floor.

Face it, large department stores are things of the past and not sustainable. Much of this has to do with not only oversaturation, but too many developers trying to cut a larger piece of the pie for themselves. In this type of environment no one wins particularly areas with population loss.
Top of pageBottom of page

Iheartthed
Member
Username: Iheartthed

Post Number: 3862
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 10:53 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

It can help, but it is more important that a market exsists. If you go back to the early 1960's, you will see that (as Mauser pointed out) that Hudson's carved out its market share for its own store by developing Northland and Eastland. These were soon followed by Westland and Southland. Soon other malls popped up to compete with those malls (Universal, Tel-Twelve, Livonia Mall). The deathnail for Downtown Shopping However was Fairlane which pretty much killed 3 downtowns when it was constructed. It was the closest regional mall to the west of Downtown, and many stores moved out of East and West Dearborn to never return.



I agree with you about markets, but Hudson's continued to exist downtown for thirty years while operating the stores at the malls. I think that the downtown Hudson's death knell was due to the business district being diluted and by suburban business districts. The loss of businesses from the central district to the suburbs seems to be most pronounced in Detroit than any other city in America.

Also, of any mall ever built in Metro Detroit, Fairlane is probably the one that made the most sense. Between having a mammoth corporate HQ for a neighbor, and being surrounded by well populated neighborhoods in Dearborn and Detroit, it just made sense.
Top of pageBottom of page

Iheartthed
Member
Username: Iheartthed

Post Number: 3863
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 10:55 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't think that building a parking deck would have done much to save Hudson's. Downtown Hudson's died because of the changing traffic patterns in the city/region. It was largely off the beaten path by the time it closed in the mid 1980s.
Top of pageBottom of page

Tkierpiec
Member
Username: Tkierpiec

Post Number: 185
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 11:02 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

detourdetroit wrote:
I have often wondered what if a range of mountains ringed the city of Detroit.


For some silly reason, this actually made me laugh out loud. :-)

I have nothing worthwhile to contribute, just that.
Top of pageBottom of page

Detroitplanner
Member
Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 2269
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 11:12 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Actually a ring of mountains is what saves Pittsburgh's downtown retail. They have one of the more healthier downtowns because it is so darned hard to get over the mountains to shop elsewhere and there is little room left for competition.
Top of pageBottom of page

Burnsie
Member
Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 1196
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 2:40 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Even if a huge parking deck had been built on the Kern Block, most suburbanites probably would have kept shopping at their local malls. Why drive all the way downtown for free parking, when there's free parking at the nearby mall?

I've always wondered if the management at Hudson's realized that they would be starting the death of the downtown store as soon as Northland opened.

Or, did they at first think that the city's population / Downtown's business would not decrease, and that the malls would simply serve the suburban residents?
Top of pageBottom of page

Daddeeo
Member
Username: Daddeeo

Post Number: 583
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 2:52 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Why would you go downtown if you had shops nearby that provided the same stuff?
Top of pageBottom of page

Detroitplanner
Member
Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 2270
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 4:23 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Burnsie, Metropolitan Detroit was growing like gangbusters up until the time that Northland and Eastland were developed. Detroit's population was growing and peaked in the late 1950's. There were lots of plans to bring apartments into the city and make it more dense, but the opposite happened.

If Hudson's did not build these malls, someone else would have and taken their market share. Retail is an ugly business. Almost all of the stores that were around 30 years ago are not around today, or they have different owners and are part of a larger network.
Top of pageBottom of page

Raptor56
Member
Username: Raptor56

Post Number: 819
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 4:29 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"I've often wondered, what if Downtown Hudson's had built a large parking deck next to it on the Kern Block and offered validated-free parking, would that have slowed the closure of the store?"

You're admitting it would close either way, so this is really a mute point. Ironically, what was once Hudsons is now an underground parking structure.
Top of pageBottom of page

Burnsie
Member
Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 1198
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 4:53 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Detroitplanner-- *Metropolitan* Detroit's population was growing, but Detroit's population peaked in about 1953. I wish I could cite a source on that right now, but I've read it in more than one publication.

Downtown Detroit started to quickly decline immediately with the opening of Northland in March 1954. Downtown Hudson's peak sales year was 1953 or 1954. By 1959, sales at the Downtown store were down some 20% from their peak. Again, I wish I had that source immediately at hand, but it's from a book published by WSU Press in the '80s.
Top of pageBottom of page

Miketoronto
Member
Username: Miketoronto

Post Number: 765
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 6:19 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Downtown stores can suburban stores can work together. The problem with Detroit is the downtown stopped being the "regional" centre for major retail activity, and this was because people were scared to come into the city. No amount of parking would have stopped that.

The real losers in this are the residents of Metro Detroit. No matter what, the malls and suburban department stores can never offer the selection of merchandise that was once offered in downtown Detroit.

But parking is not the answer.
Big department stores still thrive in major cities around the world along with their suburban branch stores. They key is to have a downtown that people want to go down to on a Saturday and feel safe in.

We can talk about people shopping close to their homes. But that is not the whole story, because people have no problem driving 40 minutes to go to Sommerset or some other mall across the region. People would still go downtown if they felt safe and it offered a reason to go down like Flagship stores, and stores you can't find anywhere else.
Top of pageBottom of page

Russix
Member
Username: Russix

Post Number: 214
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 6:34 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

^"Downtown Hudson's peak sales year was 1953 or 1954. By 1959, sales at the Downtown store were down some 20% from their peak."

Streetcar service terminated 1956.
Coincidence? I think not.
Top of pageBottom of page

Sludgedaddy
Member
Username: Sludgedaddy

Post Number: 309
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2009 - 7:03 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If the parking structures , that you envisioned, had happened, Hudson's today would be operating it's various counters behind "ghetto glass " patitions. Most certainly, the condoms and the baby formula would be secured by locked cabinets and most of the merchandise would be of the inferior quality manufactured in foreign Asian sweat-shops that can be found in the Sprawl Malls today. Gosh, how I love the smell of plastic in those World of Shops venues. But, I bet that imagined Hudson's would have one hell of a nail salon and the wig department would be top of the line!
Top of pageBottom of page

Mtm
Member
Username: Mtm

Post Number: 347
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 7:26 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Royce,

You had it EXACTLY correct with:
"I know about the talk back in the 70s about cutting off Woodward to car and bus traffic and building a roof over Woodward and enclosing the area to make a "Downtown Mall."


Coleman actually started building the Mall. They closed Woodward to MOST traffic, put in block pavement, and removed most of the traffic lights. Problem was they didn't stop ALL the traffic. Busses were still allowed to use it and, because traffic lights had been removed, they zoomed up and down willy-nilly almost like they were trying to pick off the pedestrians. Trying to cross Woodward to get to Hudson's was often, literally, taking your life in your hands.
Top of pageBottom of page

Burnsie
Member
Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 1201
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 9:29 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sludgedaddy-- Hope you're not serious! Although Downtown Hudson's in its later days was more and more a clearance center for stuff that the suburban Hudson's stores didn't sell, Hudson's management never would have let the store turn into what you described. And that's why it closed.
Top of pageBottom of page

Waxx
Member
Username: Waxx

Post Number: 311
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 5:43 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was thinking make it into a nice upscale mall like the Watertower in Chicago. I saw NO REASON for them to tear that building down, it-unlike Michigan Central Station-was in GOOD shape! It could've and should've been restored at least to some offices or something. Even though Campus Martius was brought back around the turn of the century, the old J.L. Hudson Bldg. would've all the more complemented it. (Thinkin' out loud like I always do)

Sadly, though. My first few times that I did go to Hudson's were in my only times growing up in the early 1980s shortly before they closed it. My memories of it then are not all that vivid, but from the older generations who'd tell me about it, I can't help but not to be in amazement about it. And there are books out about old landmarks that used to be the center of our neighborhoods!
Top of pageBottom of page

Crawford
Member
Username: Crawford

Post Number: 518
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 6:29 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Waxx, nobody would build a "nice, upscale mall" there because there wasn't (and isn't) a market for such businesses in downtown Detroit.

The Rennaisance Center opened with an upscale collection of Somerset Collection-style stores, and they all closed within a few months.

Similarly, the New Center used to have a Saks Fifth Avenue department store. It closed in the mid 1970's, I think.
Top of pageBottom of page

Russix
Member
Username: Russix

Post Number: 215
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2009 - 8:37 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If the upper floors were mixed use and the first floor had something like a Kmart it would probably be doing very well today.
Top of pageBottom of page

Detroitrise
Member
Username: Detroitrise

Post Number: 3828
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 19, 2009 - 6:25 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

and the first floor had something like a Kmart



No, they would have shut it down in 2003 before abandoning the region for Chicago.

It would have been better off with a Wal-Mart or mega Dollar Store (unfortunately).
Top of pageBottom of page

Detroitplanner
Member
Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 2271
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 19, 2009 - 9:46 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

DR there are some very successful multi floor Kmart stores that have operated for years in Cities such as New York and Philly. One of the main attractions for these stores are they are located near transit shops, with the smaller purchases (milk, cleaning supplies) on the same floor as transit making it an easy stop on your way home. http://www.labelscar.com/penns ylvania/gallery-at-market-east
Top of pageBottom of page

Burnsie
Member
Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 1203
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 19, 2009 - 1:01 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Detroit Edison, Michigan Bell and Blue Cross signed commitments to lease space in Hudson's in the mid-'80s, but Reagan killed the Urban Development Action Grant program, and that was the end of that.

Perhaps Hudson's demolition was inevitable, but it didn't help that Dayton Hudson irresponsibly sold the building in Dec. 1989 to a half-baked "developer" that had no track record. Up to that point the building was still in good, secured condition, but immediately after the sale it was stripped and vandalized.
Top of pageBottom of page

Detroitbob48209
Member
Username: Detroitbob48209

Post Number: 22
Registered: 02-2009
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 4:55 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If my memory serves me correctly, Dayton Hudson had bought most of the block behind the store and north, (bounded by Broadway/Grand River/John R/Farmer) and all of the underused/empty buildings except for the old Paul's Cut Rate Drugs on the west side of Broadway and he refused to sell. Dayton Hudson offered him the old grocery store location in the shoppers park across the street which he declined. The city refused to condemn the building, so the parking deck was never built. The city planning division indicated that Dayton Hudson was planning on relocating the corporate headquarters to Detroit, using the upper floors of the Hudson store (Gr. River/Farmer bldg) for corporate offices and data processing. A bridge would have connected the parking deck to the main building and also provided parking for the retail operation. Shortly after this, Dayton Hudson filed for a going out of business permit for the Hudson store, to which Mayor Young supposedly remarked that they "will never close that store"...I'm sure that this contributed to the demise of the store, but was not totally responsible. Dayton Hudson, now Target remained in MSP and sold the property off. The site is now the location of the people mover and the YMCA.
Paul's Cutrate eventually and ironically moved across the street into the same space Dayton Hudson had offered, in the old Shoppers Park, now owned by another concern after the price was upped for the People Mover construction.
Top of pageBottom of page

Burnsie
Member
Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 1205
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 5:45 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Detroitbob48209-- Thanks for that interesting info! It seems odd that the parking ramp couldn't have shared the block with the drug store.

So, if Hudson's had built that parking ramp it might have kept the store open for at least a few years more?

Do you know if Dayton Hudson ever looked into building a parking ramp on the Kern Block? It'd be hard to believe that wasn't considered.
Top of pageBottom of page

Miketoronto
Member
Username: Miketoronto

Post Number: 767
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Monday, March 23, 2009 - 5:49 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I doubt parking had anything to do with the Hudson's store closing. There is and was plenty of parking in downtown Detroit.

It would be interesting to see if the Hudson's Store still pulled a good profit in the downtown location.
It had been noted for example that many stores that closed in downtown Buffalo actually had the highest sales per sq foot in the region even in the gloomy years, yet the companies still closed the downtown stores.
Top of pageBottom of page

Burnsie
Member
Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 1206
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 9:45 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Miketoronto-- Downtown Hudson's was actually still the top unit in sales, or right up there, among all the Hudson's stores. But the sales had dropped so much that they apparently couldn't cover the cost of utilities, maintenance of antiquated physical plant, shoplifting, etc. It's hard to know exactly, since I don't think all the exact numbers were ever released publicly.

The book "Hudson's: Hub of America's Heartland" noted that the Downtown store's water bill by circa 1977 exceeded the total water bill of all the branches combined.

(Message edited by Burnsie on March 24, 2009)
Top of pageBottom of page

Russix
Member
Username: Russix

Post Number: 219
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 11:38 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

^"The book "Hudson's: Hub of America's Heartland" noted that the Downtown store's water bill by circa 1977 exceeded the total water bill of all the branches combined."

Is this from people coming in to use the bathroom? Water use for boiler heating? A massive elbow pipe connecting right from the water meter to the sewer line?
Top of pageBottom of page

Burnsie
Member
Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 1210
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 12:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bathrooms (not just for the customers and salesclerks, but a headquarters office staff of over 1,000), huge boilers, food service, cleaning, etc. And you can bet that all of the plumbing was old and wasteful.

During construction of the parking ramp that occupies the site now, there were major problems when a pipe that carried water directly from the Detroit River (for air conditioning) was accidentally opened up.
Top of pageBottom of page

Suburbanbliss
Member
Username: Suburbanbliss

Post Number: 23
Registered: 02-2009
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 12:31 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Don't forget the beautiful bronze drinking fountains that graced every floor!
Top of pageBottom of page

Danindc
Member
Username: Danindc

Post Number: 4607
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 1:34 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

The book "Hudson's: Hub of America's Heartland" noted that the Downtown store's water bill by circa 1977 exceeded the total water bill of all the branches combined.



What was the square footage of all the branch stores?
Top of pageBottom of page

Burnsie
Member
Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 1211
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 24, 2009 - 2:22 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The only branch s.f. info I have is for Genesee Valley (270,000) and Northland (slightly over 500,000). But just those two combined equal some 35% the space of the Downtown store (2.2 million s.f.). All the branches combined easily had more space than Downtown.
Top of pageBottom of page

Miketoronto
Member
Username: Miketoronto

Post Number: 770
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 - 3:20 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And here is the problem with Hudson's. Detroit has what is probably the largest suburban branch stores in the country.
500,000 sq foot branch stores are unheard of in almost any other city. Infact 500,000 is usually the average size of a downtown flagship store in most cities including the US.
It is no wonder the downtown store could not be as much of a draw is the suburban stores were so large and had such a large selection of merchandise.

I really have to say I have never heard of such large branch stores except in Detroit.
Look at most suburban department stores and they are in the 150,000-200,000 range at best.
Top of pageBottom of page

Crew
Member
Username: Crew

Post Number: 669
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 - 4:03 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mike, We likes 'em big
Top of pageBottom of page

Danny
Member
Username: Danny

Post Number: 4584
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 26, 2009 - 8:38 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Royce quotes "I've often wondered, what if Downtown Hudson's had built a large parking deck next to it on the Kern Block and offered validated-free parking, would that have slowed the closure of the store?"

NO! The white flight, economic flight, new and better department stores in various shopping malls, rising violent crime rates and low customer confidence cause the The J.L. Hudson flagship store in Downtown Detroit to close. When the flagship store closed, other businesses in Woodward Corridor close as well. Plus the parking structure in Woodward next to the Hudson's would have an ugly skyline effect in the business district. Therefore an underground parking garage would a best ideal so that a new "PREMIER DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY" would happen.
Top of pageBottom of page

Nickstone
Member
Username: Nickstone

Post Number: 84
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Friday, March 27, 2009 - 1:53 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

amen, Danny... my travels to other cities confirm your ideas... what a premier opportunity the UA is... right.

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.